pull any punches


pull any punches
(not) pull any punches to speak in an honest way without trying to be kind.

This man doesn't pull any punches. I wouldn't like to get into an argument with him


New idioms dictionary. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • not pull any punches — (not) pull any punches to speak in an honest way without trying to be kind. This man doesn t pull any punches. I wouldn t like to get into an argument with him …   New idioms dictionary

  • not pull any punches — not pull any/your/punches phrase to express your feelings and opinions, especially criticism, very clearly James did not pull any punches in his criticism of our work. Thesaurus: to give your opinionsynonym to show or express emotions …   Useful english dictionary

  • pull your punches — pull your ˈpunches idiom (informal) (usually used in negative sentences) to express sth less strongly than you are able to, for example to avoid upsetting or shocking sb • Her articles certainly don t pull any punches. Main entry: ↑pullidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • pull no punches — to deal with something honestly without hiding anything. One congressional leader pulled no punches, saying “we have a recession.” The 20 minute training video pulls no punches, showing chilling pictures of accident victims. Usage notes: often… …   New idioms dictionary

  • not pull your punches — not pull any/your/punches phrase to express your feelings and opinions, especially criticism, very clearly James did not pull any punches in his criticism of our work. Thesaurus: to give your opinionsynonym to show or express emotions …   Useful english dictionary

  • pull one's punches — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Not to hit as hard as you can. * /Jimmy pulled his punches and let Paul win the boxing match./ 2. To hide unpleasant facts or make them seem good. Usually used in the negative. * /The mayor spoke bluntly; he didn t pull… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pull one's punches — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. Not to hit as hard as you can. * /Jimmy pulled his punches and let Paul win the boxing match./ 2. To hide unpleasant facts or make them seem good. Usually used in the negative. * /The mayor spoke bluntly; he didn t pull… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pull — pull1 W1S1 [pul] v ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(move something towards you)¦ 2¦(remove)¦ 3¦(make something follow you)¦ 4¦(take something out)¦ 5¦(clothing)¦ 6¦(move your body)¦ 7¦(muscle)¦ 8 pull strings 9 pull the/somebody s strings …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • pull — 1 /pUl/ verb 1 MOVE STH TOWARDS YOU (I, T) to use your hands to make something move towards you or in the direction that you are moving: Help me move the piano; you push and I ll pull. | pull sth: I pulled the handle and it just snapped off! |… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • pull\ one's\ punches — v. phr. informal 1. Not to hit as hard as you can. Jimmy pulled his punches and let Paul win the boxing match. 2. To hide unpleasant facts or make them seem good. Usually used in the negative. The mayor spoke bluntly; he didn t pull any punches.… …   Словарь американских идиом